Articles Tagged with Insurance Companies

In Part 1, we discussed the duty owed by property owners in terms of snow and ice removal. In this post, we will discuss what happens if you are injured after slipping on ice or snow. It is important to know what steps are available to you and what, if any, fault you may have in the matter. 

As noted in the previous post, it used to be much harder to recover damages from a slip and fall caused by snow and ice. A 2010 Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”) case (Papadopoulos v. Target Corp) overturned an over-a-century-old law regarding the accumulation of snow. The duty placed on property owners was raised and it became easier to prove negligence. However, just because it became “easier,” does not mean collecting damages will be easy. There are still multiple factors at play.

All slip and fall cases fall under a class of personal injury claims requiring you to prove negligence. You must establish a duty, a failure to meet that duty, injuries, and that the breach of duty caused those injuries. In a case of snow and ice-induced slip and fall case, the duty owed is by the landowner and he or she owes you “reasonable care” for a safe walking environment, that is, free of ice and snow. Further, you must suffer a significant injury, for example, sprained or broken bones or traumatic brain injury from hitting your head. Finally, you need to establish that the ice was the cause of your slip and fall. 

Massachusetts has been called many things throughout history, but at the top of that list should be “consumer friendly.” This is true even about our laws. They try to protect consumers instead of big businesses.

One example is a section of the Massachusetts’ Consumer Protection Act, specifically Section 93a, that affords broad protections to consumers from merchants engaging in “unfair and deceptive” practices. This includes sales and leases, debt collection, many contracts, foreclosure, landlord-tenant law, and even bad faith insurance claims.

If you have been subject to unfair business practices, the easiest course of action would be to simply come to an agreement with the business with which you have a conflict. However, if all disputes were that simple, there would be no need for laws protecting the rights of consumers. If you are unable to resolve a complaint with a merchant, i.e., an individual or business, informally, then you may decide to take legal action. 

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